Whole Foods Market proposal for Burbank

A rendering of the proposed Burbank Whole Foods Market and conjoining 241-unit luxury apartment complex that may be built at 3401 West Olive Ave. (Courtesy of Van Tilburg, Banvard & Soderbergh, AIA / August 16, 2013)

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The Planning Board on Monday is slated to weigh in on a proposal to build a 241-unit luxury apartment complex on top of a 43,000-square-foot Whole Foods market in the city’s Media District.

The project, dubbed “Talaria at Burbank,” is proposed to be built on nearly 4 acres at 3401 W. Olive Ave.

City staff advised the board at Monday’s hearing that the City Council approve the project. The meeting will take place at 6 p.m. at City Hall.

The land at the project site is currently occupied by three office buildings, a bar, a church, 41 multifamily residential units and two single-family residences, all of which would be demolished if the project is approved.

Construction is proposed to be done in a single phase over 28 months.

At previous community meetings, residents have shared concerns about potential traffic congestion and inadequate parking. A traffic study found that out of the 24 intersections analyzed for potential traffic impacts, four would be impacted, which could be mitigated with traffic improvements, according to a city report.

The amount of parking proposed, however, meets the city’s requirements. The development would include 760 spots, 262 of which would be allocated for supermarket customers. The proposed Whole Foods would be open daily from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., according to a city report.

Meanwhile, the number of apartment units proposed exceeds the 58 dwelling units-per-acre density maximum for residential projects in the proposed zone. Under the general plan, a maximum of 223 units could be developed on the project site, though with 241 proposed units, developers are requesting a density increase of 8%.

On Tuesday, the City Council postponed closed-door property negotiations with the Cusumano Real Estate Group — because the city owns three parcels of land in the project area — and decided instead to have an open discussion on the matter when the project comes before the council, which is tentatively slated for Sept. 30.